SEAWORTHY + MATT ROSNER LIVE REVIEW

November 14 2010
SEAWORTHY + MATT ROSNER LIVE REVIEW

SEAWORTHY & MATT RÖSNER
Fremantle Arts Centre, Fremantle
07/11/10

Rösner ushered the sounds of those environments into the room, while Webb warmed his fingers with the sort of subtle, emotive guitar-phrases that Seaworthy is renowned for.

SEAWORTHY & MATT RÖSNER
Fremantle Arts Centre, Fremantle
07/11/10
This small gathering at the Fremantle Arts Centre was a million miles from the Sydney Opera House and the mindless masses herded under its sails – for the ‘industry’ arse-lickin’ that is the ARIA’s – on Sunday night. But, then, when it comes to live music, the size of the crowd is often inversely proportional with the artistic creativity and credibility on offer, as was the case tonight.

Local experimentalist Adam Trainer covered plenty of creative territory during his impressive support set, starting with the warm reverb of melancholic guitar notes and ending his journey with the long, slow breaths of a small accordion. In between those two points, he added drones to looping guitar lines, processed the sounds of a snare drum and glockenspiel to create a foggy, strangely nautical audio-stew, and even coaxed a pulsating chorus of (what sounded like) LSD-laced frogs from his laptop. That latter feat found an ideal counterpoint in the aforementioned accordion, which subtle processing tweaked into the improvisation’s beautifully resonant final act.

With two guitars and a laptop of field recordings, Cameron Webb (aka Seaworthy) and Matt Rösner offered similar resonance and beauty as they launched their Two Lakes album locally. With photographic images of the coastal lake regions that inspired the work looming large on the wall behind them, Rösner ushered the sounds of those environments into the room, while Webb warmed his fingers with the sort of subtle, emotive guitar-phrases that Seaworthy is renowned for. Indeed, his improvised, country-tinged, Mick-Turner-esque playing style evokes a sense of loneliness, longing and/or reflective melancholy with rare economy and grace.

Admittedly, the album’s field recordings may have been a little under-utilised, or obscured, later in the set, but it hardly mattered as the pair contributed to a rich, textural, e-bowed, dual-guitar drone. It was resonant, it was beautiful, and it was a million miles from ARIA-land. Exactly where the crowd wanted to be.
ANTHONY WILLIAMS

TAGS:   seaworthy, matt rösner, matt rosner
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